Tag Archives: wild life refuge

WHOOPING CRANE

WHOOPING CRANES

ENDANGERED BIRDS

What is the tallest bird in North America? At 5 feet tall that would be one of the rarest birds we have here in Texas. Grus Americana(Whooping Crane) is listed on the Endangered Species List on June 6th, 1970. One of the most beautiful birds I have ever seen.

Looking for small shrimps at the Aransas Refuge

Looking for small shrimps at the Aransas Refuge

FANTASTIC MATING DANCE

Take a look at this video of the mating dance of this pare of happy Whooping Cranes: http://youtu.be/XCHQ-CoqFdU Remember these Whooping Cranes are 5 feet tall. Watch the Male. He is working hard to impress his mate. These kids mate for life and normally they will live up to 24 years. If one Whooper passes on the other will accept another mate. These guys share the brooding chores as well. There is one or the other always on the nest; now that is dedication. How many humans share child care? Chicks are rust colored until about four months of age when their feathers start turning white. The chicks acquire their white color with black wing tips as they enter their first spring.

New Born trying out it's long legs

New Born trying out it’s long legs

BREEDING GROUND

Wood Buffalo National Park in northe rn Canadais the breeding grounds for the Whooping Crane. Wintering grounds for the Whooper is in Rockport on the Texas coast at the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge. September is the fall migration and in late March starts their long trip North back to Canada.

MIGRATION AND POPULATION

Migrating across North America in the 1800’s the Whooping Crane count was estimated to be about 1400 birds. By the late 1930’s, thanks to MAN’S over hunting and the decimation of wetlands habitat, the Aransas Whooping Crane population dwindled to a mear 18 adult birds.

These kids usually raise only one chick a year

These kids usually raise only one chick a year

Through a concerted effort to protect wetlands and the Whooping Cranes themselves the population is slowly starting to grow. In 1993 the population has grown to 112, not much but showing an increase. In 2002 an estimated 173 birds. Today a population exists in the Kissimmee Prairie of Florida, the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge with the only migrating Whooping Cranes and a small captive-bred population in Wisconsin. To help out these beautiful birds please contact Wildlife Diversity Program at 1-800-792-1112×4644 or: mark.klym@tped.state.tx.us.

PROTECTION

Whooping Cranes are protected in Canada, the United States, Mexico and are one of the rarest birds in North Americana. What are the greatest threats to our Whoopers? GUESS! Man and Man Made; power lines, habitat loss and hunting. We almost made this

Loss of habitat and hunting has dessimated this species

Loss of habitat and hunting has dessimated this species

species extent in the 1930’s because the high fashion industry had to have their feathers for their womens hats and adornments, and in fine restaurants of the period. We as “supposedly intelligent” people have killed these birds down to a population of only 18 adults. Look at us. We killed the Carrier Pigon until there were none left on this earth and we have been working hard to wipe out the Whoopers. AMAZING come back so far don’t you think? In spite of all our efforts the beautiful creatures are trying to make a come back. Take a look at this link. “Why is the Whooping Crane Endangered?” http://whoopers.usgs.gov/why.htm

THE FAMOUS AMERICAN BUFFALO

Take a look at this link to The Famous American Buffalo( Bison Bison) Another beautiful animal found in North America. Read about the arrival of the American Buffalo slowly migrating south as far as Mexico and east to the Atlantic Coast, South to Florida. The most consintrated areas were on the plains from rocky Mountains to the Mississippi River and from Canada to Texas. This link (http://thebestofsausage.com/the-famous-american-buffalo) will take you to another story of one of our fantastic North American natives that have survived throughout the ages.
Take some time to read about our birds and animals and drop me a line.  If you would like more information or want to help contact USGS here:       http://whoopers.usgs.gov/why.htm         Love to hear from you.
Hope you enjoyed my blog. Best wishes………….Frank

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